ADVANCING THE BASIC AND TRANSLATIONAL STUDY OF THE HOST-MICROBE INTERACTION

The last 100 years of microbiology research have clearly established that symbiotic and pathogenic microbes colonizing humans have the ability to impact health, disease, and drug action (Pharmacology and Pharmacy). A next step in studying the complex interaction between host and microbe is to "directly" define the molecular factors that govern biological function (i.e. proteins, metabolites, post-translational modifications) and delineate their associated mechanisms of action. Towards this goal, the Gonzalez laboratory utilizes a systems scale to single target approach to study bacterial pathogenesis, host responses to infection, and the human microbiome. At its core, the laboratory develops and applies multiplexing quantitative proteomics tools to simultaneously track thousands of protein dynamics and associated post-translational modifications in an accurate and high throughput fashion. We then interface microbiology techniques to characterize important factors identified during these interactions. When appropriate, translational studies of therapeutic value are undertaken in tissue culture, murine models, and by the analysis of human biospecimens. This information is then used to design novel strategies for the detection or treatment of microbial-driven infectious diseases in humans.

RESEARCH PROJECTS

 

HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTION

MICROBIOME

MASS SPECTROMETRY AND MICROBIOLOGY TOOL DEVELOPMENT

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